My Design Process

Hi all, ever wonder what goes into a crochet/knit pattern? Well, I can’t really say for everyone else, but here is a glimpse of what I put into each design. At the moment, I am starting a new bralette top design, The Rosewood Bralette. So these steps will be based on making tops, but it’ll be more or less the same for others in the future.

**NOTE: These steps may or may not be the order I do it in for all patterns**

MY DESIGN PROCESS

STEP 1: BASE PATTERN
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I normally start with the size that I wear and create a “base” pattern that I will eventually alter into other sizes. I find it a lot easier because if I know something fits me then I can calculate the smaller sizes and assume it fits someone before it gets tested. If I didn’t do it this way and started off with the smaller sizes, by the time I make my size, it may not fit me which means I’ve wasted making the other sizes that most likely would not fit anyone else. I’ve done this in the past, so I know what I personally should do to make it an easier process for myself!

STEP 2: ALTERING THE BASE PATTERN
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Sometimes I’m not sure how something will look until I’ve made it and it may not turn out how I’ve expected. I think this goes for a lot of other things, in general. Once I create the base pattern, I will alter and fix anything I am not happy with. This could be anything from changing the design, adding more stitches, adding or taking off rows, etc. I don’t think things will always turn out good on the first go, sometimes it does and that’s a blessing 😀

STEP 3: CREATING SMALLER SIZES
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After altering the pattern to my liking, I will start making the smaller sizes. I physically make each size to gather the total stitch count, know the measurements, etc. This way people don’t have to waste their time figuring it themselves. I mean it would be easier for me just to make one size and explain how to alter it, but it wouldn’t take that long to make the other sizes, PLUS this way I am able to learn a lot more about everyone’s unique body.

Also, I might not get as much emails asking how to alter the top which I might not be able to help fully because I have not personally tested it or I don’t know in general. Even though, my sizes are based on average sizing and every body is different, it might be easier for someone to alter that size to fit someone better. Even though this takes me a lot longer, I prefer putting in some good work and being happy with my design than trying to find an easier alternative! Well, for me at least. OH and it helps me too when I make and sell the item! Win, win 😀

STEP 4: PICTURE TUTORIAL
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Once I created most of the sizes, I start doing the picture tutorial with the smallest size (XS). It is a lot more efficient, faster, and easier for me because it takes less time making an XS than a L and the good thing is that it’ll be the same for the larger sizes, except for the total stitch count and maybe some extra rows. This takes a lot of time because I have to make the item and take pictures at the same time. The picture tutorial will be great to reference back and not be as cluttered by trying to fit in all 4 sizes with parenthesis, etc. If you know what I am talking about you know what I mean. Some people are okay with it, but I personally don’t like it because it gets confusing for me, so, I base my picture tutorial on ONE size that you can 100% refer back with the larger sizes (if that makes sense). Depending on how complicated the design is, taking and editing photos take me a long time. For example, The Jethro Bag, had around 60ish photos and I edit each one of it! It’s super tedious, but the outcome is worth it to me. If you don’t need the picture tutorial, then you don’t have to use it, but I always find it nice to have it there in case you want to make sure you’re on the right path.

STEP 5: LAYOUT
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I already created a template on my word document of the layout that I like for ALL my patterns. This includes a section for the title, my name, section for materials/notes/gauge/abbreviations, the ending, copyright, etc that is already written and placed on my document. This helps me keep most of my patterns cohesive. I am totally obsess with keeping everything looking neat, tidy, and consistent. Once I finish editing the pictures, I drag them into the document, crop, resize, and add additional notes, if needed.

STEP 6: TESTERS
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I will start looking for testers before I’m finished with the raw pattern. I like to have at least 2 testers per size (8 total) for my tops to have a better sense of how well it would fit. The time range I normally give is about 1-1.5 weeks to test the pattern. It could be less or more depending on how small or big the project is. During this time, my pattern is about 90% done, but it is technically still in it’s “raw” phase. All the feedback I get helps me make the pattern a lot better. After looking at it for so long, I start to feel like I’m not able to see my mistakes anymore, so having other people go through them lets me know what’s wrong with the it. Without people volunteering to test for me, I don’t think I would be able to create and publish patterns that I am proud of. So all you makers who have helped me past, present, and future, THANK YOU from the bottom of my heart, you guys are so special to me!!

STEP 7: BLOG/LISTINGS
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While everyone is testing the pattern, I like to draft up a blog about the design release. The blog normally includes a bit of my process, but it highlights more of the markers who have tested my pattern. It lets people see how different sizes fit other bodies other than myself. They have done so much for me, I want people to know who contributed to it! I write the blog up as much as I can during this time.

I’ll also draft up listings for my etsy, ravelry, and craftsy. I don’t know about you, but this part is always so tedious! I already have a specific layout for etsy and it’s easy to plop it in and add things, but I always dread it! Not sure why >.<

STEP 8: FEEDBACK/EDIT
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Once I get feedbacks from the testers, I’ll edit typos, add certain things they’ve suggested, etc. This normally doesn’t take me too long, unless I have to fully change multiple rows or whatever it may be.

STEP 9: PHOTOS FOR LISTINGS
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I like to have two types of photos for my physical and digital listings. It’s a lot easier for me to differentiate between my patterns and my physical items, so, people are able to look through my shop easier and I personally think that it looks better that way since things are consistent.

STEP 10: PHOTOSHOOT
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I try to do a photoshoot with every new design that I come out with. I think that it gives people a sense of how it looks like being worn. I’m not always able to do a photoshoot right away, but eventually I will. It takes time and some planning, but I always enjoy being able to see my work taken professionally.

STEP 11: SOCIAL MEDIA
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I like to create content for my social media (facebook, instagram, twitter, etc.) when I release the design. I guess you can call it a “campaign” for my product and self advertisement. I do plan this out to a certain extent, I want to be able to portray my design the way that makes me proud to release it.

OVERALL,

I hope these informations help you understand what goes into a design, especially my design. I put a lot of work into it and I am constantly updating the patterns, if needed. I feel that as I grow, my techniques/skills/aesthetics/layout/style/theme/etc. change and I like to change my patterns accordingly. Some patterns takes months and some takes weeks, but all I know is that I’m willing to provide a good design. This definitely isn’t something that will make you a lot of money, but it shows you how passionate I am. So thanks to everyone who has helps me with my designs, bought my designs (pattern/physical), liked, commented, etc. It’s people like you that make me feel motivated everyday and do what I do.

Find my work here: ETSY | RAVELRY | CRAFTSY

DID YOU KNOW THIS MUCH WORK IS PUT INTO A DESIGN? WHAT IS YOUR PROCESS? WHAT OTHER TOPICS WOULD YOU LIKE ME TO WRITE ABOUT? LET ME KNOW DOWN IN THE COMMENTS!

If you found this blog helpful, please like, share, and don’t forget to follow for more interesting post! Thanks!
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